Strategy 2025

The Australian Wine Industry Looks Ahead

1. The Australian Wine Revolution 1966-1996
2. The Success Story of Australian Wine
3. 2025 Trends Favour Wine
4. Vision 2025
5. Australian's Wine's Competitive Edge
6. Market Opportunity
7. Resources to Achieve Growth Scenarios
8. Government Partnership Critical to Success
9. Strategies
10. The Next Five Years
11. Implementation of Vision 2025

Strategy 2025 logo

The winner has been wine, the late 20th century lifestyle beverage of moderation. It is more than a beverage, it has become a lifestyle product with a high degree of complementarity with food, hospitality, entertainment, the arts and tourism.

1. The Australian Wine Revolution

In 1966 Australian domestic wine consumption amounted to a little more than two bottles per head of population per annum. 78% of wine consumption consisted of fortified ports and sherries while premium varietal table wines barely ranked in the statistics (just 700 tonnes of Cabernet Sauvignon was processed in Australia in 1966 and Chardonnay did not exist).

These statistics underscore the enormous change which has occurred in the wine industry in just 30 years. Since 1966 wine production has tripled (from 156 million litres to 572 million litres), Australians now consume 24 bottles of wine per head of population per annum, 80% of which is now table wine. In a far cry from the 1960s, the classic world grape varieties of Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay contribute 165,000 tonnes or nearly 19% of total production.

What has created such a revolution? Innovation in viticulture and wine processing technology allied with changing consumer preferences towards a Mediterranean diet stimulated by European immigration; an increased incidence of dining out; a growing concern about health and social responsibility relating to activities such as driving; and a series of complex demographic and sociological factors such as the changing role of women and the aging of Australia's population have all contributed.

The winner has been wine, the late 20th century lifestyle beverage of moderation. It is more than a beverage, it has become a lifestyle product with a high degree of complementarity with food, hospitality, entertainment, the arts and tourism.

Despite this increasing domestic consumption of Australian wine and a massive growth in exports, the industry's successful development should not be seen as a recent unrepeatable phenomenon.

Vines were introduced by Captain Arthur Phillip in 1788 and wine production was carried on by the English gentry in NSW, Victoria and SA for the first half century of settlement. The influx of European immigrants to the Gold Rushes of the 1860s and the accompanying waves of cultural migration by settlers such as the Silesians to the Barossa Valley provided the necessary skills to grow better quality grapes and make good wines. It has also left Australia with a legacy of 100 year old vines, historic buildings and a vast accumulation of expertise.

The Australian wine industry, with acknowledged leadership and a proud heritage of innovation, has come of age in the 1990s. It is now a mature industry with a global focus, a significant presence in world markets and international product successes ranging from Grange to Jacobs Creek.

Top of Page | Next »

AWRI

Braud

Leeder Analytical

ICMD

SIMEI

Bayer

WID 2016