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News posted on Friday, 23 December 2016

Floats 2017: why the odds favour a buoyant market
The initial public offering (IPO) market is poised to rebound in 2017 as blockbuster IPOs return, corporates divest assets and resource floats recover.The global sharemarket rally, sparked by Donald Trump's US election win, is fuelling hopes of a big year for Australian floats. A few billion-dollar IPOs – absent in 2016 – are expected as investors' risk appetite grows. Australia's second-largest wine company, Accolade Wine, is tipped for a billion-dollar listing or trade sale in 2017.

Merry Christmas and happy holidays
Today’s edition of Daily Wine News is the last time you will hear from us this year. Thanks for being a part of the journey with us in 2016. The team at Winetitles Media hopes all of our Daily Wine News readers have a safe and enjoyable festive season. We look forward to sharing all the news from the grape and wine community with you again next year. We will be back in action from Tuesday 3 January. Catch you again in 2017 – for the build up to vintage.

Wineries race to the sun in bid to cut power costs
Dozens of wineries in South Australia have been harnessing the sun’s power for purposes beyond growing grapes. Wineries in the state are embracing solar energy at twice the rate of other business sectors, installers say. Yalumba Wine Company, in the Barossa Valley, is just weeks away from completing the largest commercial solar system installation to date by any Australian winery. It will have taken more than three months to put the 5,384 individual panels in place at three sites.

Respect for Country
To celebrate a decade of Hot 100 Wines, Warndu’s Damien Coulthard painted an exclusive piece for the wine show. Coulthard is one-half of Warndu with his partner Rebecca Sullivan. Together the pair champion native ingredients with their range of brews and oils. Coulthard’s painting, called Mai Wapantyutu, which means ‘fruit for the picking’ in the Adnyamathanha language, is a “story of country and a place of creation in relation to the making of wine. It represents the actual wine regions of South Australia, the valleys and hills, the soils and sky,” Coulthard says.

Winery loses trademark suit against other winery
An industry that has benefited from so much interest and competition is eventually going to find itself with a massive litigious roadblock on its hands if something isn't done. That said, the typical trademark dispute in the alcohol spaces normally deals with fairly creative names, artistic labels, or cross-industry trademark concerns. Less common are the types of trademark disputes in which the trademark in question is laughably broad or common. Less common, but not completely absent, however. In Australia, for instance, one winery sued another over a trademark it holds on the word "signature." The suit failed for exactly the reasons you're thinking of.

Winery loses trademark suit against other winery
An industry that has benefited from so much interest and competition is eventually going to find itself with a massive litigious roadblock on its hands if something isn't done. That said, the typical trademark dispute in the alcohol spaces normally deals with fairly creative names, artistic labels, or cross-industry trademark concerns. Less common are the types of trademark disputes in which the trademark in question is laughably broad or common. Less common, but not completely absent, however. In Australia, for instance, one winery sued another over a trademark it holds on the word "signature." The suit failed for exactly the reasons you're thinking of.

Pernod Ricard's Millstream doubles full-year profit
Pernod Ricard’s New Zealand unit Friday reported an annual profit that more than doubled but warned it was still assessing the financial impact of the 7.8 magnitude Kaikoura earthquake that rattled the country in November. The liquor group's Millstream Equities posted a profit of $7.4 million in the year ended June 30, from $3.6 million a year earlier as revenue rose to $241 million from $228 million. Its total operating expenses were $19.6 million versus $10.1 million in the prior year, reflecting higher management fees, repairs and maintenance.

How a South Auckland millionaire made it big
Going from apprentice carpenter to multi-millionaire might sound like a fairytale. But that's exactly what Sir George Fistonich has done - not withstanding a few bumps along the way. Growing up in the South Auckland suburb of Mangere, Sir George Fistonich recalls a humble childhood. Before turning his passion for wine into a giant business called Villa Maria, he was a certified carpenter for almost five years. "I built my first winery, so, that was quite useful," he says.

Trump Winery Plans to Hire More Immigrant Workers
The company is going against the President Elect’s campaign promises. Trump Winery wants to add six new immigrant laborers to its staff. Though the Virginia-based winery is owned and operated by Donald Trump’s son Eric, the move is a textbook example of the hypocrisy and self-serving dealings of the Trump campaign. ABC News reports that the company filed documents with the U.S. Department of Labor on Monday requesting temporary worker visas under the H2-A program.

Trinchero Family Estates acquires Napa’s Mason Cellars
Trinchero Family Estates, the St. Helena-based maker of Sutter Home and 45-plus other wine and spirits brands, on Wednesday said it acquired Napa’s Mason Cellars, known for its Pomelo and Three Pears white wines. This acquisition will “add to the breadth and depth of our collection of brands,” as the superpremium ($7–$10 a bottle) and ultra-premium ($10–$15) segments continue to show growth, according to Trinchero President and Chief Operating Officer Bob Torkelson. “TFE remains committed to diversifying our portfolio in a way that supports our mission to be consumer-driven and consistently offer quality and value,” Torkelson said in a statement.

A Year in an Indian vineyard
Sula winemaker, Ajoy Shaw’s account of a year in a vineyard is fascinating and provides an insight into what it means to say a good wine is made in the vineyard. January 1 It is the first day of the New Year and it seems everything is new and has changed overnight. Most of the vineyards have grapes that are growing in size and also changing colour. Nearly all the bunches look the same, with hard berries softening, while sugar is starting to build in the early ripening varieties. The French call this process of change veraison.

Wine bottle that fits through a letterbox
Entrepreneur Joe Revell, of London start-up company Garçon Wines, has designed a wine bottle that can fit through a letterbox. The 29-year-old came up with the idea for the business four years ago when talking about Graze, a subscription service for healthy food, with a friend. The friend loved wine, but worked in the city and was not able to get wine sent to the office he worked in, and was often out when bottles were delivered to his home. Revell said his target market is primarily 18-40 year olds, living and working in the city and people who lead busy lives but want to try different types of wine. Revell realized there was a gap in the market and set about designing a classic Bordeaux-style 750ml plastic bottle with a company in China, which is thinner and slightly longer.

Bayer


Flavourtech


New Holland


Braud


Kauri


WID 2017