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News posted on Friday, 16 December 2016

Barossa winemaker Yalumba loses trademark case
In one corner is a $60 bottle of red made by Australia’s oldest family-owned winery; in the other, a $20 Barossa shiraz from one of country’s best-known brands, Jacobs Creek, owned by global giant Pernod Ricard. What they have in common is the use of the term “Signature” and for the last six months, the use of that single word has been a major fight in the Federal Court. Yesterday the court dismissed an application by Yalumba against the Jacobs Creek Reserve Barossa Signature range, which claimed the Pernod Ricard term infringed on the Yalumba trade mark, “THE SIGNATURE”.

Reaction to Riverland Wine roundup
Most of the response was positive. Only one negative in fact; one of the major wineries called to notify the Association that they will not be advising their indicative prices to the Association. That’s fair. The Association doesn’t have a contract with any wineries, doesn’t have any grapes to sell. It could be argued; doesn’t need to know who’s paying what for grapes. Never mind the positive things the Association strives to achieve for the common good; the striving for excellence in all things; the constant focus on continuous improvement and collaboration. Never mind about leadership and engagement.

Clare Valley Winemakers Honoured With Charity Award
The founders of Tim Adams Wines, in the Clare Valley, in southern Australia, have been awarded life memberships by Variety children's charity for their fundraising efforts. The vineyard, founded by Tim Adams and Pam Goldsack, has been donating a portion of money raised by the sale of certain wines since 2001, as well as participating in and sponsoring events for the charity. Variety helps provide children and families in need with financial support for medical supplies, treatments, and equipment like wheelchairs.

Mr. Mick’s Winning Way
Winning Hot 100 Wines with a brand that honours his mentor Mick Knappstein is pleasing for Mr. Mick owner and chief winemaker Tim Adams, especially as the approachable, innovative and drinkable ethos of the wine show mirrors that of his mentor. Every year, the Hot 100 Wines discovers the state’s most drinkable wines, with Mr. Mick’s 2015 Novo Sangiovese judged the hottest South Australian wine of 2016/17 ahead of 1300 other local drops, the first Clare Valley wine to win the Hot 100 in the wine show’s 10 year history.

Fine festive fizz
Whitey recommends his favourite local champers for the fizz-up on Jesus's birthday. A hallmark of the types of fizz that generally delight me most is a smell much like the waft of a field of ripening wheat about five minutes after a light sunshower. I know it’s verboten to mention rain while a record grain crop is still in the ground, but that gentle country bouquet sure is a pretty and memorable thing, especially if you’re not a wheat farmer.

'Increase in interest and investment'
Central Otago is seeing an increase in wine tourism as more tourists wend their way around the region's cellar doors. Tourism Central Otago and Central Otago Winegrowers manager Glenys Coughlan said as a result many of the area's wineries were investing in additional facilities to take advantage of the growth. ''We have certainly seen an increase in interest and investment in wine tourism and I would estimate several million dollars [going] into new and improved facilities in recent times,'' Ms Coughlan said.

Exports, tourism fight to recover after quake
arts of New Zealand's key export industries and its vital tourism sector are battling to get back on track a month after a deadly earthquake rocked the nation, crippling roads and slowing shipping. At one of the country's main ports in Wellington, 'no-entry' signs dot parts of the site hit by liquefaction, cracking or buckling, hampering shipments of items like meat and farm produce to destinations including China and Australia. That has left winemakers scrambling to find temporary storage or ship wine out to be stored elsewhere to ensure the 2017 vintage is not affected. New Zealand's wine exports are worth NZ$1.6 billion and growing fast in markets like China and the United States.

Hugh Johnson accepts orange wine challenge
Hugh Johnson has taken up the challenge of wine writer Simon Woolf to taste a selection of orange wines after Woolf took exception to Johnson’s comments that such wines were “a sideshow and a waste of time”. The sporting gesture form the veteran wine personality, following comments made in The Washington Post last month, led to Woolf organising a tasting at 67 Pall Mall on Wednesday 14 December. The private tasting was followed by an orange wine masterclass hosted by Woolf for 67 Pall Mall members and selected press and trade representatives.

Bancroft wines appoints new sales and marketing head
UK wine importer Bancroft Wines has appointed Hallgarten Druitt & Novum’s former commercial director Susan Harper to head up its sales and marketing teams. Harper has joined the company in the new role of sales & marketing director, and is set to play a key role in boosting the company’s position in established markets, strengthening current customer relationships and developing relationships with new customers, Bancroft Wines’ managing director Neil McAndrew said. Harper left Hallgarten Druitt & Novum Wines in early 2015, after four years with the company.

New vines in old soil to commemorate 225 years of heritage
Early December saw Nederburg staging a special vine planting event to honour the 225-year legacy of the winery’s founder Phillipus Wolvaart, who acquired the Paarl farm in 1791. The original framed title deed has pride of place in Nederburg’s historic Old Cellar Museum. It is clearly dated 1 November 1791 and bears the signature of Acting Governor of the Cape, Johannes Isaac Rehnius. The planting was expertly guided by Nederburg’s viticulturist, Bennie Liebenberg.

Banrock Wines and Jimmy’s Wines support the Bahamas
Since 1995 Banrock Station Wines, have been protecting the environment in their native Australia. Now as their brand grows they are proud to be spreading the word of environmentalism to The Bahamas and exemplifying their Motto “Helping Protect our Beautiful Planet” Banrock believes in re-investing its profit back into environmental projects or protection of delicate areas – like the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. The company has contributed to more than 130 projects in more than 13 countries, investing over six million dollars for Planet Earth.

Wanted to rent in Mclaren Vale For Vintage 2017
Large shed From approximately late Feb until late April, dates negotiable. We have our own equipment. It would need to be sufficient for up to six fermenters, press and crusher. Barrels would be stored off site. Contact Matt 0405 294 500 or Alan 0408 819 108.

Banrock Wines and Jimmy’s Wines support the Bahamas
Since 1995 Banrock Station Wines, have been protecting the environment in their native Australia. Now as their brand grows they are proud to be spreading the word of environmentalism to The Bahamas and exemplifying their Motto “Helping Protect our Beautiful Planet” Banrock believes in re-investing its profit back into environmental projects or protection of delicate areas – like the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. The company has contributed to more than 130 projects in more than 13 countries, investing over six million dollars for Planet Earth.

Centuries-old black wine makes a comeback
We all know about reds, whites, and rosés. Some have learned about orange wine (made by keeping the grape skins and seeds in contact with the grape juice) and even blue wine (red and white grapes with anthocyanin, indigo, and sweeteners added). Now we have a dark, meaty, sexy new alternative: black wine. Technically still a red wine, black wine is from Cahors, a small town on the Lot river in the Midi-Pyrénées region of southern France.

Bayer


Flavourtech


New Holland


Braud


Kauri


WID 2017