Daily Wine News

Search Daily Wine News Archive

News posted on Wednesday, 10 June 2015

An underground wine cellar in Tasmania is for sale, for $3 million
On the mainland, $3 million can buy you a fair bit – a six-bedroom home in Manly, or even Port Melbourne penthouse. However if neither of those ideas takes your fancy, you could also spend that money on a wine cellar in Tasmania. The clifftop property is a 20-minute drive from Hobart, and includes 8 hectares of land, a 300-square-metre shed, and the most unusual wine cellar in Australia. The wine cellar is housed in a tunnel that is a staggering nine stories deep. Like something out of a Bond film, it took mining experts six-and-a-half months to build.

Campaign to boost WA vineyards’ international wine exports
A NEW campaign to help WA wine producers satisfy the growing global thirst is planned. The State Government is in talks with the local wine industry to set up a specialist “export development office” in Perth, The Sunday Times can reveal. If given the go-ahead, the ­initiative would aim to get more WA wine on to shop shelves and restaurant tables around the world. The EDO is a proposed partnership between the Australian Grape and Wine Authority, Wines of WA and the Department of Agriculture and Food.

New hybrid grapes help grow wine industry in cold US regions
CORINTH, N.Y. (AP) — The Marquette grapevines clinging to a steep, rocky hillside in the southeastern Adirondacks are among a host of new grape varieties that have enabled a boutique wine industry to take root in areas of the Northeast and Midwest that were previously inhospitable. There were about 2,000 wineries in the U.S. in 2000; today, there are more than 8,000, according to the industry publication Wines and Vines. "Across the country we've seen a huge expansion in wine and grape production and wine-related tourism."

Alsace winemakers vote to require 'Dry' designation for labels
Alsace’s white wines offer incredible diversity—from fresh, vibrant wines that sing across the palate to sweet, floral off-dry whites that make for exquisite food pairings. The problem is that consumers cannot always tell which style is in the bottle they’re looking at in the store. Now a group of local winegrowers is working to clear up the confusion by requiring dry wines to be labeled as such.

Spencer Hill Wines hit spot from start
This year marks the 25th anniversary of Phil and Sheryl Jones' purchase of land in the Moutere Hills to establish Spencer Hill Wines. The most well-known wine from this producer is the Tasman Bay label, gaining this recognition after the very first chardonnay produced at Spencer Hill in 1994 was named Champion Chardonnay, Champion White Wine and Reserve Wine of Show at the Air New Zealand Wine Awards in 1995.

Prosecco DOC Consortium says ‘there will not be a shortage’ of Prosecco this year
The Prosecco DOC Consortium has responded to recent reports of the potential shortage of Prosecco saying “that there will not be a shortage of Prosecco in the coming months.” The Consortium confirms that the 2014 harvest was affected by some hard weather and that yield were less than the maximum yield. However, certified production yield were still up 17.9 per cent more than the previous year's harvest. They also ruled out any significant price increase during the summer.

Loire wine producers barred from using Vouvray name
Leading Loire winemakers François Chidaine and Jacky Blot have been banned from vinifying their Vouvray wines in the neighbouring commune of Montlouis. Vouvray’s appellation rules were changed in October 2009 to ensure that all wines bearing the name, whether still or sparkling, were made within Vouvray. The only exception is Nazelles-Négron, a neighbouring commune just outside the eastern limit of the appellation.

Loire wine producers barred from using Vouvray name
Leading Loire winemakers François Chidaine and Jacky Blot have been banned from vinifying their Vouvray wines in the neighbouring commune of Montlouis. Vouvray’s appellation rules were changed in October 2009 to ensure that all wines bearing the name, whether still or sparkling, were made within Vouvray. The only exception is Nazelles-Négron, a neighbouring commune just outside the eastern limit of the appellation.

Vineyard goes carbon neutral using pesky weed to lock CO2 in soil
There are few organic, carbon neutral wineries in Australia and for those that exist, nature's next innovation is never far from mind. Temple Bruer Winery at Langhorne Creek in South Australia is already carbon neutral but hopes to become Australia's first organic and carbon neutral winery, without relying on buying any carbon credits. The winery has planted 1.2 hectares of Arundo Donax, a plant long considered an environmental pest. The winery has planted the weed as a way of locking carbon in soil.

Researchers working towards smoke taint answers
GRAPEGROWERS in the northern Adelaide Hills are only just beginning to understand the full impact of the Sampson Flat bushfire, five months on. While many can finally breathe a sigh of relief, others face the prospect of pouring their hard work down the drain. Smoke leaves an invisible trace that remains hidden in the grapes, bound up with sugars, until it is released during fermentation and storage. University of Adelaide Associate Professor Kerry Wilkinson says it is “a very complicated process” that had scientists baffled at first.

Winemakers tour heading south
Dunedin wine enthusiasts will be delighted to know that the Negociants winemakers tour is once again coming to Dunedin. Negociants is a major importer and distributor of wines in the New Zealand market. Among the 25 wineries being showcased are d'Arenberg, Jim Barry, Yalumba and Vasse Felix from Australia; Rippon, Mischa's Vineyard and Two Paddocks from Central, and Fromm, Greywacke, Huia, Nautilus and Saint Clair from Marlborough.

Latest issue of the Wine & Viticulture Journal out now
Winter in the Southern Hemisphere has officially arrived and so too has the May-June issue of Australia’s Wine & Viticulture Journal. Richard Smart authored one of the most controversial articles in the last issue of the Journal when he suggested Australia should look to New Zealand for some guidance on the future success of its wine industry. Smart’s written another contentious article in the May-June issue regarding the Australian Grapevine Propagation Material Standard which he feels fails to adequately address the spread of grapevine trunk diseases.

WGGA announce two new pest management projects
Wine Grape Growers Australia (WGGA) yesterday announced two consultancy projects aimed at improving pest and disease management in vineyards. Agribusiness consultancy Ag Dynamics has been appointed to prepare a strategic plan and business case, with help from the industry, for long-term national biosecurity arrangements in viticulture. Stuart Perrigrew of Ag Dynamics will undertake the project, bringing with him 25 years’ of experience working with businesses on pest and disease management.

Bayer


Flavourtech


New Holland


Braud


Kauri


WID 2017